VISA SPOTLIGHT

Click any VISA type below to learn more.

  • H-Visa

    • The H visa is used by a foreign national who will be employed temporarily in a specialty occupation. There are many types of H visas: H-1B (Specialty Occupation), H-1C (Professional Nurses Working in Health Professional Shortage Areas, H-2A (Agricultural Worker), H-2B (Seasonal Worker), H-3 (Company Trainee) and H-4 (accompanying family members of H visa holders). Click here to display the rest of this document
  • K- Visa

    • K-1 Fiancé Visa Information: The K-1 Visa, also known as the K1 Fiancée Visa, may be used by United States citizens who wish to bring their prospective husbands or wives to the United States with the intention of getting married. Minor children of fiancées can also accompany them to the United States as they can be issued K-2 Visas. The U.S. citizen must file a petition with the USCIS on behalf of the foreign fiancé. After the petition is approved, the fiancé can obtain a K-1 Fiancé Visa. The K-1 Visa is issued at a U.S. embassy or consulate abroad. The marriage must take place within 90 days of the fiancé entering the United States.
  • K-1 Fiancé Visa

    • A fiancé is a person who is engaged to be married. The marriage must be legally possible according to laws of the state in the United States where the marriage will take place.
    • The two people must have met in person within the past two years. The Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) grants some exceptions to this requirement. For example, it may be contrary in some traditions for a man and woman to meet before marriage.
    • The K-1 is valid for four months from the date of approval from USCIS. Consular officers can extend the validity of the petition (revalidate the petition) if it expires before the processing of the visa application is completed.
    • After K-1 fiancé visa is approved, your fiancé may enter the U.S. through a U.S immigration port-of-entry. The U.S. immigration official gives your fiancé instructions on what to do when he/she enters the United States. You must get married within 90 days of your fiancé’s entry into the United States.
    • After marriage, your spouse must file Application to Register Permanent Residence or to Adjust Status with the USCIS office that serves the area where you live in the United States.
    • The K-1 visa allows a fiancé to enter the United States one time only. If you leave the United States after entering on a K-1 visa, you may not re-enter on the same visa. If you want to leave and re-enter the United States, you should apply for Travel Document with USCIS.
    • As a K-1 visa holder you may file Application for Employment Authorization with the USCIS office for a work permit (employment authorization document).
    • A child under the age of 18 of a fiancé may receive a derivative K-2 visa from his/her parent’s fiancé(e) petition. The American citizen petitioner, must make sure that the child is named in the Fiancé petition. After the marriage of the child’s parent and the American citizen, the child will need a separate form Application to Register Permanent Residence or to Adjust Status. The child may travel with (accompany) the K-1 parent/fiancé(e) or travel later (follow-to-join) within one year from the date of issuance of the K-1 visa to his/her parent.
    • A separate petition is not required if the children accompany or follow the alien fiancé(e) within one year from the date of issuance of the K-1 visa. If it is longer than one year from the date of visa issuance, a separate immigrant visa petition is required.
  • K-3 Marriage Visa

    • K-3 Marriage Visa Information: The K-3 Visa may be used by United States Citizens who wish to bring their husbands or wives to the United States. Minor children of overseas spouse can also accompany them to the United States as they can be issued K-4 Visas. The K-3/4 visa is valid for two years and may be renewed 120 days prior to expatriation.
    • The K-3 spouse visa is a nonimmigrant visa which allows the spouses of U.S. citizens to enter into the U.S. and await the availability of an immigrant visa.
    • A spouse is a legally wedded husband or wife. Cohabitating partners do not qualify as spouses for immigration purposes.
      • Common-law spouses may qualify as spouses for immigration purposes depending on the laws of the country where the common-law marriage occurs.
      • In cases of Polygamy only the first spouse qualifies as a spouse for immigration. The U.S. does not allow polygamy.
      • If previously married, must show previous marriage ended in divorce (terminated) before current marriage.
    • The K-3 visa is valid for two years and allows for multiple entries into the U.S. The nonimmigrant K-3 visa may be applied 12 prior to the expiration of the authorized stay. The extension will be granted in two-year intervals.
    • While on K-3 visa you may apply for Employment Authorization and study in the U.S.
    • You may not apply for a change of status from K-3/K-4 visa to another nonimmigrant status, in the U.S.
  • L-Visa

    • An L visa is a visa given to aliens who are entering the US to work for the same employer, its affiliate or subsidiary the alien has worked for in their home country. The alien must be employed for one (1) year in the past three (3) years by the parent, branch, affiliate or subsidiary of the US Company prior to filing his L-1 application. In order to receive an L visa, the alien must prove that they have specialized knowledge that is required for the job (L-1B) or that he is an executive or manager of the company (L-1A). Click here to display the rest of this document.
  • TN-Visa

    • For Canadian and Mexican nationals employed in a professional occupation, including business visitor, treaty traders, investors, intra-company transferees and professionals to work in the U.S.
    • Key Requirements:
      • The intended U.S. activity must be in a profession listed on Schedule 2, and the alien must possess the necessary credentials to be considered a professional in one of the Schedule 2 fields.
      • The alien must posses a bachelor's degree or higher degree, unless Schedule 2 lists alternative qualifications. Equivalency to a required degree through a combination of experience and education will not be accepted for TN purposes; aliens in this situation must apply for H-1 status.
    • Duration of Stay:
      • Alien may be admitted to the United States in TN status for the period of time required by the employer, up to a maximum initial period, of stay of one year.
      • TN professionals can receive extensions of stay in one-year increments, with no outside limit on the total period of stay.
      • The limits on stay for H-1B (six years) and L non-immigrants (five or seven years) do not apply to TN aliens. In addition, Canadian and Mexican professionals who have already completed six years in the H-1 or L nonimmigrant category can immediately qualify for the TN category without fulfilling the requirement of one-year-abroad imposed by the INS regulations for H-1 and L aliens.
      • The only limitation on the duration of stay of TN non-immigrants is that the purpose of the stay must continue to be temporary.
  • B Visa

    • B-1 Business Visa
      • B-1 visas are for nonimmigrant's who wish to enter the U.S. to engage in short-term business activities, and not to seek permanent employment.
      • B-1 visas can be issued to foreign corporate personnel coming to the United States to set up a subsidiary, as well as to persons who are thinking about making an E-2 investment.
      • Religious workers, professional athletes and domestic servants can also qualify for B-1 visas.
      • A B-1 visa holder can negotiate contacts, participate in conferences or seminars, and consult with business associates.
      • A B-1 visa is valid for five to ten years and the visa holder is allowed to stay in the U.S. while there I-94 card is valid. Failure to extend or return home can result in revocation of current visa status.
      • B-1 visitors are admitted for not more than one year and may be granted extension of temporary stay in increments of not more than six months.
    • B-2 Tourist Visa
      • B-2 visas are for people who are entering the U.S. for pleasure or tourism.
      • Foreign students entering the United States visit prospective schools may also qualify for a B-2 visa, so long as the embassy or consulate issuing the visa is informed of the prospective student's plans at the time the B-2 visas is granted.
      • B-2 visas may also be issued to foreign nationals coming to the United States for medical treatment.
      • In order to obtain a B-2 visa, the alien must prove that he is traveling to the U.S. temporarily and does not plan to abandon his foreign residence.
      • B-2 visa is also issued granted to spouses, children and parents of B-1 visa holders.
      • A B-2 visa is valid for five to ten years and the visa holder is allowed to stay in the U.S. while there I-94 card is valid. Failure to extend or return home can result in revocation of current visa status.
      • B-2 visitors are admitted for not more than one year and may be granted extension of temporary stay in increments of not more than six months.
  • E Visa

    • An E visa is a based on an Investment Treaty or other agreement between the U.S. and the country the alien is coming from based on Friendship, Commerce and Navigation: E-1 (Treaty Trader), E-2 (Treaty Investor) and E-3 (Australians)
    • E-1 Treaty Trader
    • For foreign nationals from countries which the U.S. has a treaty of friendship, commerce, and navigation who are coming to the U.S. to engage in substantial trade between the U.S. and the Alien's home country.
      • E-1 visa holder must hold a supervisory or executive position or posses skill which are essential to the successful operation of the enterprise.
      • E-1 visa is valid for two years and may be extended indefinitely.
      • To qualify for an E-1 visa, the alien must be a national of one of the 44 treaty countries eligible.
      • Spouse and children of an E-1 visa holder may remain in the U.S. in E-1 status and may work and attend school in the U.S.
    • E-2 Treaty Investor
    • For foreign nationals engaged in international investment between the U.S. and the foreign national's home country.
      • Holder must make an active and substantial investment as well as perform an essential role in developing and managing a business enterprise that results in the creation of job opportunities for U.S. workers.
      • E-2 visa is valid for two years and may be extended indefinitely
      • To qualify for an E-2 visa, the alien must be a national of one of the 44 treaty countries eligible
      • Spouse and children of an E-2 visa holder may remain in the U.S. in E-1 status and may work and attend school in the U.S.
    • E-3 Australians
    • Specifically designed for citizens of Australia who whish to enter the U.S. to perform in a specialty occupation for a U.S. employer. E-3 visa is very similar to the H-1B visa.
      • E-3 visa is valid for in two year increments and may be extended indefinitely.
      • A specialty occupation requires theoretical and practical application of a body of specialized knowledge along with at least a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent.
      • Spouse and children of an E-3 visa holder may remain in the U.S. in E-3 dependant status.
  • P Visas

    • There are four types of P visas: P-1 (Athlete/Entertainment Group), P-2 (Artistic Exchange), P-3 (Culturally Unique Artists), and P-4 (Spouse or Children of P-1, 2, & 3)
    • P-1 Athlete/Entertainment Group
    • Visa designated for entertainers, circus artists, and athletes coming to the U.S. temporarily to perform at a specific competition or event.
      • P-1 visa can also be granted to support personnel of the P-1 Athletes/Entertainment group
      • P-4 Dependent classification
        • Spouses and unmarried children under 21 of P-1 visa holders may enter and remain in the U.S. in P-status
        • Not allowed to work but may attend school
    • P-2 Artistic Exchange
    • Visa issued to artists or entertainers, entering the U.S. as part of a reciprocal exchange program.
      • Two organizations are involved in the exchange program, the U.S. and one abroad.